Using Views And Filters In Google Analytics

Have you ever wanted to filter out yourself or your office from your site’s Google Analytics? Or, have you ever wanted to make modifications to the data as it comes into Google Analytics? If so, using filters are a great way to do that!

What Are Views?

If you have already set up Google Analytics, you may have noticed that you were viewing reports in a view called “All Website Data” or similar. This is the default “view” that is set up when you create a new property. Each view is a different set of data that was sent into Google Analytics for the property.

When your site sends data to Google Analytics for a property, it will look through all your views to see which views to add the data to. Right now, you may just have the “All Website Data” view which, by default, will receive all data from your site. This is a great place to start.

However, there may be things you want to remove from the data. For example, if you have a dedicated desktop computer, you may want to remove all of your interactions with your own site from the data. You may also want to remove spam and bots from the data too.

Since views can also have different permissions, I have seen some people set up views with specific limited data and give some users only access to that view. One example may be a salesperson who only needs to focus on data relating to certain pages and needs to set up goals that are different than the main view’s goals.

Setting Up Your First View

Before you begin with views and filters, the first thing to know is that you will never want to modify the “All Website Data” view. Data cannot be added to a view retroactively. So, if you accidentally set up a view to where it doesn’t store any data for your site, you will not be able to get the data back. So, by keeping the “All Website Data” view as-is, you know you will also have all the data to go back to.

So, most people set up a second view. Some people call it “Real View”. Some call it “Master View”. For most of my sites, I just call it “Without me and spam”.

Keep in mind that the only data in a view is what was collected after it was created. So, none of your data already in Google Analytics will appear in a view which is why you want to set up your first view as soon as possible.

To set up your new view, go to the Admin area and select your account and property. On the far right, will be the view settings for your default view. You can click the “Create View” button to create your new view.

Screenshot of the Admin view in Google Analytics showing columns for Account, Property, and View.

Name your new view, change the timezone if needed, and then click “Create View”. If you are not already, go back to the Admin area and click the dropdown on the far right under “View” to select your new view. Make sure to not make changes to the “All Web Site Data” view.

The first thing that you will want to do is click “View Settings” and scroll down to the “Bot Filtering” option. Go ahead and turn that option on.

Screenshot showing new view settings including "Bot Filtering".

Note: If you want to track what people search for on your site, be sure to turn on “Site search Tracking” while you are in the View Settings. In WordPress, the default query parameter to enter is s. If you are not using WordPress, you will want to search or ask the support team of the software you are using to determine the query parameter.

Once you have turned on bot filtering, go ahead and click Save. Great! You have your first custom view set up. Now, let’s add your first filter.

Adding A Filter

If you are not already, go back to the Admin area and click the dropdown on the far right under “View” to select your new view. Make sure to not make changes to the “All Web Site Data” view. This time, click on “Filters”.

Screenshot of view settings in the admin of Google Analytics with "Filters" highlighted to reveal an empty table for filters.

Filters are how we can tell Google Analytics what to include, exclude, or modify in this view. We can use filters to exclude IP addresses (such as your desktop computer), locations, certain referrals, certain parts of your site, and much more. Additionally, you can use filters to exclude data that you know is spam.

For example, there was an issue in 2018 where a lot of bots were sending in fake information into certain fields within Google Analytics. The easiest way to get rid of it was by using a filter.

Lastly, you can use filters to modify data as it comes into Google Analytics. Something to remember in Google Analytics is that everything is case sensitive. So, example.com/thankyou is different than example.com/THANKYOU. Also, if you are using campaigns, spring-sale-2019 is different than SPRING-SALE-2019.

As such, Google Analytics will report these as two different things. So, we could use a filter to lowercase or uppercase everything before it gets entered to ensure Google Analytics counts these things as one thing.

To get started with our first filter, click “Add Filter”.

Screenshot of creating a new view with the filter name set to "Removing my desktop" and filter type set to "Predefined".

After you create some filters, you can re-use them in other views and other properties to make things easy. Since we are creating our first one, we will click “Create New Filter”. Next, enter in your filter’s name. Be descriptive of what the filter is doing as you may have many filters in the future.

Google Analytics has many of the common filters as “Predefined”. There are many more things you can do with filters by using “Custom” but, for now, we will use Predefined. Select “Exclude” from the first dropdown and “traffic from the IP addresses” for the second dropdown. Finally, select “that are equal to” in the third dropdown.

Now, open up a search engine, such as Google, and search “What’s My IP?”. Most search engines will list your IP for you. Then, copy that IP address into the “IP address” field for your filter.

Depending on which type of filter you are setting up, Google Analytics may tell you how many data points would be filtered out by the filter in the “Filter Verification” section to help you verify that you set it up right.

Once you are ready, click “Save”.

The last thing to keep in mind before you add more filters is that these are applied one-at-a-time in the order you add them. For most sites, this will not be a problem. However, there may be times you want to have filters build upon each other. After you add multiple filters, you will see a new “Assign Filter Order” button appear.

Screenshot of the filter table showing several filters added to the view including "Spam Filter" and "Force Lowercase Campaign Source"

If you click this, you can re-order the filters to achieve the results you need.

Next Steps

Great job! You now have your custom view and a filter applied to it. Now, if you haven’t already, you will want to make sure you have event tracking set up as well as your conversion tracking.

Getting Started With Google Tag Manager

As you grow and market your websites, you tend to add more 3rd-party scripts on your site for assisting with marketing. Some scripts may be for tracking conversions and advertising such as Google Analytics, Facebook pixel, Quora Pixel, and HotJar.

As you add more of these types of scripts or “tags”, it can be a bit technical in adding these to your site or making changes. Additionally, if you have multiple people working on marketing, it may be challenging to manage the changes everyone is making. This is where the concept of a “tag manager” comes in.

What is Google Tag Manager?

A tag manager is a service that allows you to add various new scripts and pixels to your site using an interface instead of having to manipulate the code. Additionally, most tag managers will enable you to have different people working on configurations and settings at the same time.

Google Tag Manager is a great way to manage your site's pixels and tags. Click To Tweet

Google Tag Manager is Google’s answer to this problem and is part of their marketing platform. Another service you may have come across is Segment.

What makes Google Tag Manager a great place to get started is because it is both free and easy to set up. It even has a quick set up to integrate some of their other products, such as Google Analytics, that you may use.

The Basics

Screenshot of main dashboard in Tag Manager showing one account and two containers.

Before we can create our account and get our tags set up, we need to review some of the concepts and terms used throughout Google Tag Manager.

Account

If you have used other Google marketing products, such as Google Analytics or Google Ads, you may have come across this before. It is important to point out that the “account” is not your Google Account. Many Google Accounts can be associated with accounts in Google Tag Manager, and you can have multiple accounts in your one Google Account.

For example, you may be using Google Tag Manager for multiple clients or even numerous businesses that you manage. You could have separate Google Tag Manager accounts for each of these.

Container

Inside each of your accounts, you can have multiple “containers”. This is similar to the “properties” in Google Analytics. Each container can represent a different site within the account. So, if your business has two separate sites, you may have one account with two containers in it.

Workspace

Inside your containers, you can have multiple workspaces. If you are the only person managing the tags and you do not make a lot of changes, you may just use only the “Default Workspace”. However, maybe you had someone else who was working with you. This other person may be testing out new tags at the same time you are.

You could have separate workspaces for each of you. Each workspace would allow each of you to make changes without affecting the other. Then, once one of you are ready, you could “publish” your changes to the site. The other person just updates their workspace to see your changes.

Tags

The “tags” are the main focus within Google Tag Manager. Each tag you create will have some configuration about how it gets triggered and what data to send to which service. You can have many different tags and even group them inside folders for organization.

Triggers

For each tag you create, you will specify what “triggers” the action. In many cases, you may use the default “page view” trigger. This would mean that the tag completes the action on every page of your site when it is loaded. This trigger is used with Google Analytics and other pixels you may add.

Some custom triggers may include when a site visitors plays a YouTube video or submits a form. These triggers would then cause certain tags to complete an action.

Variables

Depending on your tags, you may have a variety of different “variables” or custom data that you want to send to your various services. One example may be the name of the video the visitor played. Another example will be your settings for your Google Analytics and its tracking ID.

Setting Up Google Tag Manager

Now that you have some basic understanding of the concepts, it’s time to create your first container. If you haven’t already, sign into Google Tag Manager.

Then, create your first account. If you are just using the product for your own business, you can name the account after your business.

Screenshot of a panel that says "Add a New Account" with a textbox with a label of "Account Name".

Next, you will create your first container. Copy in your website’s URL and then click create.

Screenshot of a panel that has a heading of "Container Setup" with a textbox with a label of "Container Name".

Once created, you should be directed to the default workspace of the container. If not, click on your container from the main dashboard.

Screenshot of the workspace overview page showing a navigation along the left and navigation along top toolbar.

Inside your workspace, you will see a menu along the left sidebar. The first item will be which workspace you are in. For now, you can stay in the default workspace. If you add new people to your team, you may want to look more into adding other workspaces.

As you make changes within your workspace, these changes will be saved but not published onto your site. After you make changes and you are ready for them to be on your site, you will click the blue “Submit” in the top-right corner. Before we do that, let’s create your first tag.

Creating Your First Tag

In most cases, the very first tag you will add is Google Analytics. So, let’s walk through how that process works. First, click “Tags” in the left sidebar.

Screenshot of a panel that says "Tags" with some text of "This container has not tags, click the "New" button to create one.".

When you first start, this screen will be empty. Over time, you may have dozens of different tags here. To get started with our first one, click on “New”.

Screenshot of panel that has two sections labeled "Tag Configuration" and "Triggering".

A new panel will appear. You can name each tag whatever you choose, but I recommend being descriptive so you can find it later. For this one, I will call it “Google Analytics”. The next step when setting up your tags is filling in the configuration. Click on “Tag Configuration”.

Screenshot of a panel that says "Choose tag type" with a list of different tags including "Google Analytics - Universal Analytics".

Another new panel will appear. In this panel, you can choose which type of tag you are configuring. There are many built-in integrations that you choose from including Google Analytics, Google Optimize, Crazy Egg, Twitter Website Tag, and more. For now, click on “Google Analytics – Univeral Analytics”. Depending on the type, the next screen shows a few different settings that you can configure.

Screenshot of "Tag Configuration" panel showing "Google Analytics" as the Tag Type with settings of "Track Type" and "Google Analytics Settings".

For this first Google Analytics tag, you will want to leave the “Track Type” as “Page View”. If you click on the drop-down for the “Google Analytics Settings”, you can click on “New Variable” to set up our tracking ID and settings.

Screenshot of "Variable Configuration" panel showing variable type as "Google Analytics Settings".

This will be your first custom variable. You can name it whatever you wish, but I would suggest something such as “Google Analytics Settings”. There are a lot of settings you can configure for Google Analytics by clicking the “More Settings” link.

However, we will keep the defaults for now. The only thing we need to do is copy in our tracking ID. If you go to the admin area within Google Analytics, you can go to the property you want to send data to from this container’s site.

Screenshot of Admin page in Google Analytics showing three columns with "Property" in the middle. In the property column, "tracking code" is highlighted.

For example, you may have a container for example.com, and in Google Analytics, you should have a property set up for example.com. So, you will want to go to that property and click on “Tracking Information”. In the menu that appears, click on “Tracking Code”.

On that page, there will be a tracking ID for this property. Copy that tracking ID and paste it back into the settings in Google Tag Manager. Finally, click save for that variable.

Screenshot of the "Triggering" section when editing the tag that says "Choose a trigger to make this tag fire".

Now, scroll down to the “Triggering” section and click on that section.

Screenshot of the triggers panel that says "Choose a trigger" with one labeled "All Pages".

For your first few tags, you will only have one trigger available. As you continue adding new tags and want to track more interactions, you will add a variety of triggers that will be listed here. For now, click on “Page View”.

Now that your tag has a configuration and a trigger, you can click the blue “Save” button.

Adding Google Tag Manager To Your Site

Before we can finalize our tags, we need to get the script onto our site. Depending on what software or platform you used to create your site, this may vary significantly.

The first step will be to click on the GTM-XXXXXX code along the top toolbar of your workspace. This will open a popup that looks similar to the one in the image.

Screenshot of a popup that says "Install Google Tag Manager" with instructions of "Copy the code below and paste is onto every page of your website".

You will need to add this code to your website to install Google Tag Manager. Once installed, you will be able to add new tags and pixels without needing to add new code. Some website software has an area to add code for the “head” and “body”. You will need to find those settings within your platform to add this code or give this code to your developer.

If you are using WordPress, you can use a plugin such as Insert Scripts in Headers and Footers. Using that plugin, you would copy in the code as shown in the image below and then click save.

Screenshot of the settings page for "Insert Script In Headers And Footers" with the textboxes having the code from the tag manager install popup.

Once you have installed the code for Google Tag Manager, be sure to remove any code for Google Analytics, if previously installed. If not, all data will be duplicated in your analytics since we are now sending that data through Google Tag Manager.

Previewing And Publishing Changes

Now that we have Google Tag Manager on our site, it’s time to finalize our changes. Along the top toolbar, you will see two buttons: “Preview” and “Submit”. If you click on “Preview” and then go to your website, you should see a popup that appears for Google Tag Manager.

Screenshot of previewing tag manager on a site. Shows a small popup along the bottom that has a summary that says "Tags fired on this page".

This preview will allow you to see which tags are firing to make sure everything is set up correctly before making these changes live for all site visitors. In our case, we can see the Google Analytics tag was fired when I loaded the page.

Now that we are happy with the changes, go back to Google Tag Manager and click Submit.

Screenshot of the submit changes panel. Shows options of "Publish and Create Version" and "Create Version" as long as textboxes for name and description.

In the new panel that opens, you can enter in a version name and description. At the bottom, you will see a list of all the changes that were made since your last version.

You could click “Create Version” without publishing. If you had multiple people working in different workspaces, this would be a way to let them see the changes without publishing to your site.

Since we are ready to add this tag to the site, we can keep the “Publish and Create Version” selected and then click “Publish”. You now have Google Tag Manager on your site and are sending data to Google Analytics!

Just to make sure, go back to Google Analytics and go to the “Realtime” page. Go to your site in a private or incognito browser. You should see your visit appear in the “Realtime” section.

Next Steps

Now that you have Google Tag Manager all set up and ready to go, you can add your other tags and pixels. Additionally, you can add new triggers and new tags to send certain events to Google Analytics. For example, you could send an event to Google Analytics when a button is clicked, a form is submitted, or a video is played.

Using Event Tracking In Google Analytics

Using Google Analytics is a great way to understand your website’s visitors. By default, Google Analytics collects data about the pages a person visits on your site. But, there are actions that a person may take on your website that you may also want to collect data about.

Maybe, you have an opt-in form on your website so people can subscribe to an email list and this form is a vital part of your sales funnel. Or, there may be videos on your site, and you want to know which videos are played the most. This is where event tracking comes in.

Not familiar with Google Analytics? You should probably check out my “Getting Started with Google Analytics” article first.

What is Event Tracking?

Screenshot of the "Overview" page inside the "Events" section of Google Analytics. Shows a line chart of number of events over the month.

Events are a specific action someone may take on your website that gets sent to Google Analytics. For example, there is a popup on this site where you could subscribe to a structured, 6-day email course on Google Analytics. When you submit the form, an event is sent to Google Analytics.

This allows me to see an aggregate view of which channels are sending the most people who sign up for the email course which helps me optimize the experience better.

Instead of a form, you might have a video on your page that you want users to watch. Many video players allow you to send an event when someone starts watching a video and when they watch the whole video. So, you could see the percent of users who watch the video and compare that based on where they came from and which pages they visited on your site.

Using event tracking in Google Analytics is a great way to add data about what actions are happening on your website to your reports. Click To Tweet

If you have a contact form or a “get a quote” form on your site, you could send an event when someone submits the form. This is beneficial when you want to see which acquisition channels are sending the most users that are submitting your form.

Then, you can see how these users go on to make purchases on your sites to optimize and test different strategies for improving the process of taking a new user through the purchase.

The Parts of an Event

Each event has a few elements to it to help you compare and track different types of events. These are the category, action, and label.

Event Category

This is a way to group a set of events together. For example, all of my content upgrades use the category of “Content Upgrades”. This could also be “survey”, “videos”, “pdf”, etc…

Event Action

This is the specific action the user has taken on your site that you want to track. For my content upgrade, I use “download”. For my email opt-ins, I use “subscribed”. Some other examples could be “downloaded”, “play”, and “stop”.

Event Label

Event labels allow you to send over some additional information about the event. If you have more than one of the category on your site, this may be an excellent way to identify which has been interacted with.

An Example

If you have multiple PDF’s on your site, you may use “pdf” as your category and “downloaded” as your action for all of them. You would then use the label to identify each of them. So, for the PDF’s, you may have labels of “My eBook”, “Meal Plan”, and “Case Studies”.

Let’s say you had a video in the header of your website called “Getting Started” and then another video in the content of your website called “Why Use Us”. You could structure your events like this:

  • Getting Started Video
    • Event Category: Video
    • Event Action: Play
    • Event Label: Getting Started
  • Why Use Us
    • Event Category: Video
    • Event Action: Play
    • Event Label: Why Use Us

Reviewing the Data

Screenshot from the "Top Events" page showing the top 3 event categories in a table with a column for total events.

Once you have events being sent to Google Analytics, the events can be seen in the “Behavior” section. In the screen above, I went to the “Top Events” section to see the top events on the WP Health website. You can add a secondary dimension to see where the user came from.

Or, you can click on one of the “Event Categories” to get a report of all the actions within that category. Then, add a secondary dimension to review those actions such as in the screenshot below where I am reviewing just the event of someone clicking the “Start Your Free Trial” button.

Screenshot of a report in Google Analytics with the "Event Action" as the primary dimension and "Source/Medium" as the secondary dimension.

If you are running paid ads, such as Google Ads or Facebook Ads, and your primary objective is to get leads to fill out a form, event tracking is useful in determining which ads or platforms are getting you the most leads for the least money.

How to Use Event Tracking

Since event tracking requires some specific code that is unique to each action on your site, it can be challenging to add event tracking yourself. Luckily, most software and features you use usually have an event tracking option built-in.

For example, I use a WordPress plugin to create content upgrades. In the settings for the plugin, there is an option that I can turn on that allows the plugin to send an event to Google Analytics when someone submits the content upgrade form.

Screenshot of a setting in the content upgrades plugin labeled "Fire a Google Analytics event when content upgrades are submitted".

I use Ninja Forms to create forms on one of my sites. Most form plugins, such as Ninja Forms or Caldera Forms, have settings (sometimes in the free version and sometimes as a paid option) to turn on event tracking.

I also use Drip for some of my email marketing. My opt-in form allows users to enter their email address to subscribe to the mailing list. The Drip settings will enable me to configure an event that is sent to Google Analytics when someone submits the opt-in form.

Screenshot of a setting in Drip labelled "Send an event to Google Analytics upon submission" with a help tip of "Look for events with the event category "Drip Opt-in Form".

Most email marketing platforms have a similar option.

If you are using YouTube videos, you can use the Google Tag Manager to set up a “YouTube Video” trigger.

What’s Next?

The next step you will want to take is to look through the various elements and products you use to see if there are settings for enabling event tracking. For most email list providers, eCommerce platforms, and form builders, there are usually options for turning on event tracking.

Next, if some of the events are part of a secondary or primary goal of the site, you could set up a goal in Google Analytics which would allow you to see the conversion percentage within many of your other reports.

Also, if you are not using UTM’s yet, be sure to check out my “Not Using UTMs? You Should Start Right Now!” article.

Not Using UTMs? You Should Start Right Now!

When you are trying to get visitors to your site from a variety of sources, things can get a little complicated when deciding which marketing channel to focus your time and money. Maybe you are using paid ads, social media marketing, email marketing, and more to drive traffic to your site.

If only 5% of your site visitors are converting to paid users or signing up for your email list, you would probably want to know which source of your site’s traffic is getting the most visitors to take action on your site.

With UTMs, you can:

  • See which links in your emails convert the best
  • See how many people click the link in your email signature
  • See which social media posts create the most customers
  • Group links across marketing channels into campaigns to compare different campaigns
  • And much more!

What Are UTMs?

UTMs (Urchin Tracking Modules) are one of the best tools to see which link is sending the most visitors to your site that are converting. In this case, converting means completing the thing you want them to do the most. That could be purchasing your product, signing up for your email list, or any other goal that you have set.

Using your website analytics, you can track the UTM parameters or components added to the end of a URL. Just getting started with analytics? Check out my “Getting Started with Google Analytics” article.

UTMs are one of the best tools to see which link is sending the most converting users to your site. Click To Tweet

You have probably come across UTMs before as you have browsed the web. The following URL is an example of a URL with UTMs:

http://example.com/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=search&utm_campaign=campaign_1

In the next image, you can see the Google Analytics for one of my sites. That is the acquisition overview.

Screenshot of "Acquisition" section in Google Analytics showing a few different channels such as Referral and Email.

We can then go deeper into these pages to see how our UTMs compare. For example, in the image below, I examined data from email marketing.

Screenshot from Google Analytics showing a list of campaigns and the sources with mediums.

Parts of a UTM

Diagram showing the parts of a UTM: campaign, medium, source, content, and term.

Each URL will have several UTM parameters added to the end which will be used in a few different ways. Let’s take a look at each part individually.

Campaign

The “campaign” part of a UTM is the name of your campaign or reason for sharing this URL. For example, you might have the main campaign for sharing your homepage. So, you could use “main” or “homepage” as your campaign name. You may also be sharing individual blog posts and use a campaign name such as “intro-to-google-analytics”.

This parameter is for you to identify the URLs when viewing the data in your analytics. Inside Google Analytics, you can compare different campaigns. So, this part of the UTM will be how the website analytics groups different URLs together.

Medium

The “medium” part of a UTM is the type of platform that you are sharing your URL on. For example, if you are sharing a blog post on Facebook, you would use “social” for your medium. If you were using a link in your email marketing, you might use “email”.

Source

The “source” part of a UTM is the platform that you are sharing your URL on. If you are sharing on social media, then your source might be “Facebook” or “Twitter”. If you share this link inside your email marketing, the source may be the specific email such as “welcome-email” or “google-analytics-course-email-1”.

Content

The “content” part of a UTM is an optional parameter that you can use to differentiate between URLs that are using the same campaign, medium, and source.

Another example would be using this to show the different links in the same email. You may send out an email announcing a new feature or sale that has multiple links. You can use this parameter to show the difference between the links using “top-of-email-link” and “bottom-of-email-link”.

Term

The “term” part of a UTM is the final parameter and is also optional. You can use this part when the URL is a part of paid ads to track the keywords. You would enter the keyword that you were targeting to keep track of which subsets of ads were converting the most visitors to your goal.

Example of Usage

Now that you have a general idea of what UTMs are let’s take a look at an actual example of how you can implement these in your marketing. Recently, I hosted a webinar. I sent out several emails and posted many times on social media. I needed to be able to know exactly which link got the most registrations so I can optimize my marketing approach.

In my announcement email, I included three links to the registration page: one at the beginning after mentioning the introduction, one in the middle after some copy about the problem, and then one at the end of the main pitch.

The UTM parameters I used were:
URL: https://frankcorso.me/webinar-register
Campaign: google-analytics-webinar-040317
Medium: email
Source: launch-email
Content: first-link

So, I had three URLs that looked like this:

https://frankcorso.me/webinar-register?utm_campaign=google-analytics-webinar-040317&utm_medium=email&utm_source=launch-email&utm_content=third-link

This URL was for the third link in my email which was:

Screenshot of email that has a link saying "Click here to register".

All three links had the same URL, campaign, medium, and source. I set the content as “first-link”, “second-link”, and “third-link”. After the email, I looked at my analytics and saw that, while more users clicked the third link, more users who clicked the second link signed up for the webinar.

Using this insight (and more gained from the next few emails), I was able to optimize the emails to convert the most users from my email lists to registering for the webinar.

I also used this same technique with social media marketing. I tested several different tweet formats including with images, without images, links at the beginning of the tweet, links in the middle, and links at the end.

I created URLs like this:

https://frankcorso.me/webinar-register?utm_campaign=google-analytics-webinar-040317&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter&utm_content=tweet-2-no-image

Again, the campaign, medium, and source were the same, but the content was different for each tweet. I can then see these values in Google Analytics to see which tweet format converted the most webinar registrations. In my case, tweets with the link in the middle of the tweet with images saw almost 200% more conversions compared to the others.

Reviewing Your Data

Once you started using UTMs, you will want to go to Google Analytics to see how your URLs are performing. To do so, begin by logging into Google Analytics. Next, click on the “Acquisition” link in the side menu and choose the “Overview” option.

Screenshot of Google Analytics showing the "Acquisition" label in the left navigation.

The overview page will list out the main mediums that generate traffic to your website.

Screenshot of "Acquisition" section in Google Analytics showing a few different channels such as Referral and Email.

From the overview page, you can click each of the mediums to look deeper into that medium. Alternatively, you can go back to the “Acquisition” menu and look into the “Traffic” or “Campaigns” submenus to start with other UTMs.

Screenshot from Google Analytics showing a list of campaigns with number of sessions from visitors.

For example, when I want to review the data for one of my campaigns, qsm_plugin, I will go to the “All Campaigns” option and then click on qsm_plugin which brings up this page:

Screenshot from Google Analytics showing a list of sources and mediums with the content for each.

Using the drop-down labeled as “Secondary dimension”, I added the “Ad Content” which is the UTM parameter of content. Using this view, I can compare which links with the same campaign, medium, and source but different contents. For example, in the screenshot above, we can see my link for Quiz And Survey Master’s landing page product provides a bit more traffic compared to some of the other products listed on the addons page. If I scrolled farther to the right, it would show the revenue generated for each of those links.

You can use this same view to review the data from any of your tests.

How to Create URLs with UTMs

Creating these URLs could be extremely difficult and time-consuming to have to type the URL out. Make sure all the parameters are correct every time can be tedious. Luckily, there are free tools to do this for you.

These tools will ask you for the UTM details and then create the URL for you. Google Analytics has its Campaign URL Builder, and Facebook has its URL Builder. I also have used this one by Effin Amazing. You can find many others by searching for UTM builder.

Once you create your URL, you will want to keep the URL somewhere to assist you in using similar URLs in the future. For example, if you are sharing a blog post multiple times on Facebook, you will want to use different content every time. So, you will need to know all the content that you have used before.

Many marketers use spreadsheets to list out each of the URLs and UTMs they have used. This allows them to look up the UTM parameters to see what they have used before.

What’s Next?

Now that you are familiar with UTMs, you will want to start using them every time that you are sharing URLs from your site. To be effective, you need to be consistent with UTMs to accurately track the data in your analytics

Need some more ideas of what to test? Try some of these:

  • Test different formats for your email signature to see which gets the most clicks
  • Test different structures for your tweets to see which gets the most clicks and leads to the most conversions
  • Try using links in various places in your email marketing to see which converts better
  • Test which business card layout drives the most traffic (use a URL shortener such as Bitly to make it easy)
  • Test conversions from presentations that you give in multiple places

What Should You Write About?

One of the most common reasons why people don’t create new content is that they do not know what to write about. I am asked all the time about where I get my ideas from. Inspiration can come from anywhere. For example, my “You Can’t Reap What You Don’t Sow” post came from a movie. However, if you are trying to write consistently, you may need to come up with some ideas without relying on something to inspire your next masterpiece.

To help you create your next round of posts, I am sharing with you the 10 post ideas that I use when I am trying to find a new post to write.

Find Questions Frequently Asked To Answer

No matter what your industry or niche is, there are always going to be questions people are asking. Sometimes, these are questions people frequently ask you. Or, these are questions that are often posted in forums or Facebook groups relating to your topic. A great post idea is to seek out these questions and then write a post answering the question.

Answering questions that you're asked often is a great way to get started with your content marketing. Click To Tweet

Even better, you could then answer the question in the forum or Facebook group and link back to your article as well. For example, this very post was created from this idea as I get asked the question about post ideas quite a bit.

How-to Specific Task

There are a lot of things that you probably do often enough that you probably know a bit more about than some of the readers on your site. Identifying a specific task and creating a comprehensive to-do for that task is a great way to create an amazing post or series of posts. For example, my posts on Google Analytics came from using this post idea.

Post About Something You Use

Similar to the idea above, there are probably quite a few services or tools that you use frequently that your viewers may not be aware of. Some of these tools may be common in your industry. However, to new people in the industry who find your site, learning about those tools would be very beneficial.

Infographic With Your Thoughts

As you browse the internet and other websites, you probably come across many different infographics. Occasionally, you are going to find one that may be beneficial to your audience. Creating a post with the infographic along with your thoughts about the graphic and how you would use the information is another way to quickly create a post that is useful to your audience.

Video With Your Thoughts

Similar to the infographic idea above, this post will include a video with some of your thoughts about the video. What I love about this idea is that you can easily go to YouTube and search for a topic in your industry or niche. Then, embed the video into your post and write a couple of paragraphs about the video, why your audience will benefit from it, and how they can use the information from the video.

Opinions On Trends In Industry

As your readers get to know you, they will begin to think of you as an authority in your industry or niche. So, hearing your thoughts and opinions on trends will be beneficial to them. Especially if it is a trend that viewers have to decide to use or not.

For example, in the web development industry, there is a huge trend to use certain frameworks such as React or Angular. Writing a post on why or why not you use one of these frameworks is very beneficial for your users as they are probably trying to make decisions about the trend as well.

opinion photo

Counter Or Response To Another Post

As you browse other sites and posts in your industry, you may come across a post that you really agree or disagree with. This is a great opportunity to create a post on your own site. Usually, if I go to write a comment and realize that I can write more than a paragraph or two in my response, I try to turn my response into a post. Then, you might be able to make your comment and link back to your response depending on that site’s comment settings. Be sure to link back to the original post so your viewers can see the original writer’s view.

Roundup Post

Is there a particular topic that a lot of people in your industry write or talk about? You can write a roundup post about the topic and include quotes and links to various experts in your industry. Not only does this become a great resource of information for your audience but it can also introduce your visitors to other people that they may be interested in.

Write About Something You Learned From A Book

If you are like me, you probably read quite a few books. If you find yourself writing a lot of notes or ideas from a particular book, it might be a good idea to write a response post on that topic. For example, when I read Traction by Gino Wickman, I found his idea of a company’s core values to be really interesting and useful which lead me to write my “Core values help guide your team in the right direction” post.

If you do this, remember to give credit to the book and author. Do not just copy the content from the book as your audience wants to know why this information appealed to you and how you are using it.

Interview

A fun post that I like to create on some of my other sites is the interview post. Find a topic that your audience would find beneficial. Then, find an expert who would be interested in answering questions that you feel that your viewers may have on the topic. I normally send an email to the expert with about 4 or 5 questions and then expand upon the answers with my own thoughts as well.

What’s Next?

With these 10 ideas, you should have a few ideas of what to create for your next post. Before you hit publish, remember to follow your post checklist.

Photo by Sean MacEntee

12 Things You Need To Do Before Publishing Your Post

I usually write at least two posts a week. Some weeks, I am publishing 4 or 5 posts. Years ago, even though I wrote every week, I still would forget to do something for my post. Then, I stumbled onto Syed Balkhi’s post “14-Point Blog Post Checklist to Use Before You Hit Publish” and I knew that was what I needed. I needed to create a checklist with all of the things I want to do with each post to ensure my post is ready to be published and marketed.

In this post, I am going to share the 12 items on my checklist that I follow when writing any post including this one. I always go through this checklist after I have written a post and before it is published.

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1. Have you proof-read your post?

This may seem like something every would do every time but there have been times when I have a lot going on that I just want to hit publish and move on to the next task. So, the very first step in my checklist is to re-read the post looking for these key items:

  • Do I have any misspellings or grammar errors?
  • Does the flow of the post make sense?
  • Do I need to cut anything out or clarify any points more?

2. Run through Heming Way App

A while ago, I stumbled upon the Heming Way App and immediately made it part of my workflow. This free app will check your writing and point out sentences or phrases that may need to be re-written as well as give you a readability grade level.

3. Add categories and tags

To help users find other relevant content on your site, you will want to use categories and tags. Depending on your theme, these may be displayed above or below your post’s content. Categories are great for overall topics and posts, usually, have one category. Tags are great for aspects of content and posts normally have 5 to 7 tags.

Recipe picture for category and tag example

A great example of using categories and tags is a food blog. Categories would be the overall recipe topics such as “Lunch” and “Dinner” and tags would be types or contents such as “Chicken”, “Carrots”, and “Apples”.

4. Create an engaging, short title

Once I have the post written and edited, I start working on the title. There are many things to consider when creating your post’s title. Will it capture attention? If someone shares the post on social media, will the title entice others to read the post? Coschedule suggests a balance of common, uncommon, emotional, and power words. They also advise keeping the title scannable. They have a free Headline Analyzer that will help you improve your titles and headlines.

5. Create the excerpt

Most platforms including WordPress allows you to create an excerpt. This excerpt is then shown in your blog as visitors are browsing your site. You want to take advantage of this and create an excerpt that tells the visitor exactly what the post is about and why they should read it.

6. Create the meta description

If you are using an SEO plugin, such as Yoast SEO, you have the ability to set the meta description search engines use to display in the search results. If you are unfamiliar with search engine optimization(SEO) be sure to read my post “What Is SEO?”. Normally, I write my excerpt first and then shorten that down to create my meta description.

7. Are you using headers?

If users come to your post and see a wall of text, it is very likely they will be hitting the back button quickly. Breaking your posts into sections allow people to see how the post is laid out and which sections they might want to read over. Only 16% of users read your content word for word. So, making your post “scannable” is very important. Using things like headers and bulleted lists help achieve this. For more info on scannable content, checkout ProBlogger’s Scannable Content: 19 Techniques to Create it.

8. Do you have images in your post?

Most website platforms including WordPress allow you to set a featured image for a post. These images will show up in your blog and when people share your post on social media. In BuzzSumo found that articles with an image every 100 words get double the number of shares compared to articles with fewer images.

Posts with images every 100 words get double the number of shares compared to posts with fewer images. Click To Tweet

They also found that Facebook posts with images get 2.3 times more engagement than posts without images. (Source). Don’t forget to add alt tags to your images for accessibility and SEO.

9. Add click to tweet

If visitors find your content useful and engaging, they may want to share it with friends or their audience. The easier you make this process, the more shares your post will have. Posts that I use a click to tweet box like the one above receive almost 3 times the amount of shares compared to posts that I do not use the box. I use the plugin Better Click To Tweet which makes it very quick and easy to set this up.

10. Link to other posts

If this post is the first post a user reads on my site, I want to show them other posts that might be relevant that they may also find useful. For example, if the user came here looking for ways to improve their blogging, they may also want to learn to use Google Analytics so they can improve their site so I would link to my introduction to Google Analytics post.

11. What is your call to action?

What should the user do after reading your post? Do you want them to leave a comment? Do you want them to sign up for your email list? Should they read other posts relevant to this post? Every post should have a call to action so the user can take action on the content from the post. For example, the call to action on this post is to download the blogging checklist PDF so visitors can go use the checklist on posts they are writing.

12. Preview

If you are writing your post in the editor, you will want to read through your content in the preview. Sometimes, your images or headers may need minor changes when viewed within your theme. Also, if you added links in your post, checking the links to make sure they work is a good idea.

As much as I would love for you to come to visit me every time that you need to refer to this list, it would probably be easier to download a PDF. Fill out the form below to get this checklist emailed to you as a PDF!

Download my blogging checklist

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Photo by Courtney Dirks

How to Use Dashboards in Google Analytics

Over the last few posts, I wrote an introduction to Google Analytics and UTM’s and a guide to tracking conversions. Those guides will help you get all of your data set up and tracking your users, but you probably want to know what you should be looking at when browsing through your Google Analytics. There are hundreds of pages and sets of data inside your analytics which can be overwhelming. You could spend hours going through it all and still not be sure what is going on. Luckily, there is a feature that makes things much easier. This feature is called dashboards.

What are Dashboards in Google Analytics?

Google Analytics Default Dashboard

Dashboards are simple pages that include several different graphs and sets of data that correspond to each other. Usually a dashboard will be built around a particular focus. For example, you may have an eCommerce dashboard that shows all the important data sets concerning what affects purchases on your site. Another example would be a content marketing dashboard that helps you see what pages and posts get most traffic from what sources and which convert better.

By utilizing dashboards, you can see all the relevant data from Google Analytics in a meaningful way. Click To Tweet

By utilizing dashboards, you can easily see all the relevant data you need in a meaningful way without having to hunt through all the pages yourself. Each set of data and graphs are referred to as a “widget”. For example, on a content marketing dashboard, you may have a widget that shows the posts with the highest bounce rate so you can see what posts you may want to improve. You may also include a widget that shows the campaigns from a particular social network that convert the best. Let’s take a look at an example dashboard.

Google Analytics Example Dashboard

In the image above, we have an example dashboard with some widgets that are relevant to tracking eCommerce. In the top left, we have the “Transactions by Source” widget. This widget is listing the top sources of traffic sorted by the revenue brought in. At a quick glance, we can see which sources may be sending more converting users. The next widget shows us the pages that have the highest amount of exits so we can see pages that we may want to improve. The pie graphs on the right show us the percentages of the medium that users are coming to the site through. Finally, we have two example line graphs. One keeps track of revenue and the other tracks users and sessions. There are hundreds of different widgets that you could use and they will differ depending on the type of data that you want or need to keep track of.

How to Set Up Dashboards

When you log in to Google Analytics, you will find the Dashboards along the left navigation like in the image below.

Google Analytics Dashboard Link

Your site will already have an example dashboard called “My Dashboard” which has some example widgets to get you started. However, you will probably want to create different dashboards focusing on different sets of data. For example, you may have an eCommerce dashboard, a social media tracking dashboard, an email marketing dashboard, and others. When you first start out, you will likely be unsure where to begin and what types of widgets you want to use. Fortunately there is a dashboard gallery where you can import many different examples to get going.

To import a dashboard from the gallery, begin by clicking the “New Dashboard” link like in the image above. From there you will see a window appear where you can select to create a brand new dashboard. In the bottom right will be a button labelled “Import from Gallery”.

Google Analytics New Dashboard Popup

Clicking that button will open a new popup that will list hundreds of dashboard examples to choose from. Browse through the list to find ones that sound relevant to you. You can always modify the dashboard in the future. For my example, I will be choosing one titled “Site Performance Dashboard”. Once you choose one, click the “Import” button underneath it.

Google Analytics Importing Site Performance Dashboard

Once the dashboard is imported, you will be redirected to your new dashboard. Browse through all of your widgets to see what the data says and how useful it is to you. You may come across a widget that needs to be modified or deleted. To do so, you can click on one of the icons in the top right corner of the widget which appears when you hover over it.

Google Analytics Dashboard Widget

Clicking the edit icon will open a new popup that will allow you to modify the title, type, and data sets of the widget. Take some time to see how each of the widgets in your new dashboard are set up so you can begin to see how these different settings can be tweaked to get the exact data sets and displays that are most helpful for you.

Google Analytics Dashboard Widget Settings

Make Your Life Easier By Having the Dashboards Emailed to You

For dashboards to be beneficial, you have to get in the habit of checking them once they’re set up. Google Analytics has options to export or email you the dashboard. Along the top of the dashboard you will find options for sharing, emailing, and exporting.

Google Analytics Email Dashboard Settings

Using the email option, you can set up the dashboard to be emailed to you daily, weekly, monthly, or quarterly so you can review it. Normally I suggest getting the dashboard emailed to you weekly. Not much will happen each day to receive it daily. You will end up over-analyzing and spending a lot more time with it. However, you don’t usually want to wait a month to review the data in case something major changes that may affect your traffic.

What’s Next?

Now that you have your UTM’s set up, tracking your eCommerce and conversions, and have your dashboards set up, it’s time to start using this data to improve your site’s traffic and conversions. The best strategy is to focus on one thing at a time and make small testable changes. For example, you could start with trying to improve the amount of traffic that comes from social media, so you would want to test different posts and tweets and different times which you can now track using UTM’s. Or you may want to improve your conversion rates, so you would use an A/B testing service to test different call to actions, headlines, and more.

In future posts, I will go over more topics for Google Analytics such as filters as well as strategies for improving your conversions. Be sure to subscribe to my newsletter to be the first to know when the posts are published!

How to Track Your Conversions in Google Analytics

In a previous post I wrote an introduction to Google Analytics. In that introduction I discussed why you would want to use it and how to set up UTM’s to learn more about what is driving the traffic to your site. The next step in using Google Analytics is to set up your conversions so you can see what traffic is driving users to your site and how many of these users are converting into customers, subscribers, or any other goal you have.

What Conversions Can Google Analytics Track?

There are a variety of ways that Google can see if your users are converting. Some are easier than others while others may require you to use some code. For My Local Webstop, I offer a free consultation for anyone considering signing up for our service. I then track that in Google Analytics so I can see which source of traffic is leading to the most consultations. For Quiz And Survey Master, I track eCommerce purchases as a conversion and report to Google how much the customer spent. This allows me to see what source of traffic is bringing in the most revenue. You can see an example of how I could use this data in the image below:

Google Analytics Channel Revenue Example

In the image above, I am comparing the different links throughout my Quiz And Survey Master plugin to see what links convert the most users into customers.

How Can Setting Up Conversions Help?

Before you set up your conversions, you probably want to know why you would even want to. Lets look at my example with Quiz And Survey Master above. It’s nice to be able to see the revenue in Google Analytics, but how does that actually help me? Using the UTM’s that I discussed in my introduction to Google Analytics, I can compare the ways people are reaching my site. Now I can combine that with my conversions and acquisition data to see what drives the most users to my site that convert into paying customers.

Google Analytics Channel Revenue

If we look at the acquisition data, we see that more people are coming to the site through searches than emails. However, since we track eCommerce for this site, we can see that people coming from emails actually convert almost 35x compared to people coming from search. We can then use this data to optimize our sales funnel.

Using goals and eCommerce tracking will reveal sources of traffic that convert better than others. Click To Tweet

There are a few ways to set up conversions in Google Analytics. We can track if a user reaches a destination URL, how long the user stays on the site, the amount of pages per session, an event, eCommerce transactions, and more.

Setting Up Goal URLS

Destination URLs are the easiest goal to set up. You can set a destination URL for a purchase confirmation page or a sign-up confirmation page to easily track users that make it to those pages. To do so, log into your Google Analytics account and go to the “Admin” page which should look like this:

Google Analytics Admin

From here, choose your View and then click on “Goals”. On the new page, click the “New Goal” button. You will land on a “Goal Setup” page like in the image below.

Google Analytics Goal Setup

From here, choose the template that is closest to what you are tracking. In this example, I will choose “Place an order”. Select your template and then click “Continue”. Now we can select what type of goal this is like in the image below.

Google Analytics Goal Description

Here is where you can choose what type of goal this is. To track the URL, we are going to select “Destination”. If you wanted to set a goal for how long the user is on the site, you can select “Duration”. If you wanted to set a goal for how many pages the user viewed during their session, select “Pages/Screens per session”. The “Event” type is useful if you want to tell Google exactly when a user performs an action. For example, instead of setting this goal as “Destination”, we could send an event to Google Analytics when the user purchases an item, subscribes to our newsletter, watches a video, and more. I won’t be going into events in this post, but if this sounds like something you are after, check out this great article on WP Beginner about event tracking in WordPress.

Google Analytics Goal Details

The last thing to do is to tell Google Analytics what URL to watch for. Enter your URL into the “Destination” section. In this case, I am telling Google to look for http://frankcorso.me/purchase-confirmation-page. If you want to assign a value to the conversion, you can do so using the “Value” option.

Be sure to click “Verify this Goal” if you have already had users get to that page to make sure you have your goal set up correctly. Once you are finished, click the “Save” button and you are ready to start tracking your goals!

Setting Up eCommerce

Sometimes, you want to know more than just if a user has successfully reached a goal. For example, in my image above, I showed how I can see the amount of revenue certain links and sources have brought in. This is done using the eCommerce tracking in Google Analytics. If you sell anything on your site, you should consider turning on eCommerce tracking to see what sources of traffic bring in the most revenue. The first step is to turn on the eCommerce tracking in Google Analytics. To do so, simply go to the “Admin” page and click on “eCommerce Settings” in your View.

Google Analytics eCommerce Settings

From here, simply switch the “Status” to “ON” like in the image above and you are all set to start gathering transaction data. Unfortunately, since there are hundreds of eCommerce solutions out there, I cannot show how to send the data for every platform. However, most of the popular solutions have a setting for this. For example, WooCommerce has an addon for this called WooCommerce Google Analytics Pro. Or, if you are already using Monster Insights for tracking your Google Analytics in WordPress, they have an eCommerce Addon which integrates with both WooCommerce and Easy Digital Downloads. If you are using any other platform, usually a quick Google search for your platform and “Google Analytics eCommerce Tracking” will get you to the right solution.

What’s Next?

Now that you have your goals and eCommerce set up, you will want to start looking at your data to compare what sources of traffic are sending the most users who are converting. From here, you will know what to focus your efforts on or what to work on improving.

In the next few posts I will go over more topics for Google Analytics such as filters and dashboards. Be sure to subscribe to my newsletter to be the first to know when posts are published!

Getting Started with Google Analytics

Imagine that your site is getting thousands of visitors per day. Now imagine that about 100 of them are spending money on the site. Obviously, you probably want to get more of the users that are spending money on the site but how do you know where these users are coming from? Or, how do you know what actions they take while on your site before spending money?

What is website analytics?

This is where website analytics comes in. Website analytics collects data about who our site visitors are, where they are coming from, and what they are doing on our sites. We can see where information about our site visitors such as where they are located, the languages they speak, and the devices they used to view your website.

We can also see information about how site visitors got to our site and which pages they spent the most time on. Additionally, we can see what actions they took on the website such as watching a video, signing up for a newsletter, or adding a product to a shopping cart.

Without website analytics, how do you know where your site visitors are coming from and what they are doing? Click To Tweet

By having all this data within one place, we can analyze the different paths visitors take to complete actions on our sites. We can then look into which marketing channels we are using that are the most profitable. This helps us to ensure we are optimizing our marketing to save us time and money.

There are many services out there that offer analytics for your website. Some of the most popular ones include Clicky, MixPanel, Heap Analytics, Fathom Analytics, and Kissmetrics. The most popular service is Google Analytics.

Google Analytics is not only free for most people, but it is also powerful and user-friendly. Even better, you can link it to your Search Console and Google Ads if you use them to add even more information into your reports.

The basics

Before we can get too far with using Google Analytics, there are some terminology and concepts that we want to explore first.

Our first round of definitions correlates to the different levels within your Google Analytics account.

Account

Inside your Google Analytics account, you can have different “accounts” for the different companies or brands that you’re using analytics with. For most people who are only using Google Analytics for their one site, they will only have one account. If you are using Google Analytics with your clients, you may have different accounts for each of your clients.

These accounts are all within your Google Analytics account, so you only have the one login to get into and work with these accounts.

Property

Inside each of the accounts, you can have different properties. These properties are individual sites or apps. For example, if you are using Google Analytics for your own site only, you may have one account with one property in it. If you have multiple websites for your company, you may have several properties within your account.

If you have clients who have multiple sites, you may have different accounts for each client and then different properties within those accounts for each site for that client.

View

Inside each property will be “views”. These views are where the data is actually stored and where you will be reviewing your data. Each “view” is a set of data within a property. For many sites, you only need one main view. However, there may be times where you have a variety of different views to analyze different subsets of data. We will look more into views in a future email.

Our next round of terms focuses on the data that is in Google Analytics.

User

This is a single individual visitor to your website. When a visitor comes to your site for the first time, Google Analytics creates a unique ID for that user and stores a cookie in their browser. If the visitor comes back to your site, Google Analytics will look for the cookie to determine if this is a new or returning user.

Session

This is a single visit by a site visitor. If someone comes to your site and views several pages, that is one session. If the person comes back next week to view some more pages, that would be considered a different session. By default, Google Analytics ends a session after 30 minutes of inactivity. So, if a person browses your site, leaves, and then comes back a few hours later, that would be two different sessions by the same user on that day.

Browsing Your Google Analytics

Now that we have a basic understanding of Google Analytics, let’s take a look through some of the content in the service. First, we can look at the Audience page to see some overview data about our traffic and its visitors.

Google Analytics Audience Overview

On this page, we can see a graph of the number of sessions that the site has had. We can also see the number of users, sessions, page views, pages per session, average session duration, and more.

We can then dive into the Audience section to compare the visitors based on a variety of data such as what language they speak, where they are geographically, what type of device they are using to view your site, and more.

Google Analytics Audience Location

Now, let’s take a look at the Acquisition section. In this section, we can discover where the users are coming from. By default, Google Analytics will break down the channels by search, direct access, social, and referrers as you can see in the image below.

Google Analytics Acquisition Overview

You can then dive into each channel further to learn more about where the users come from in that channel like in this image:

Google Analytics Acquisition Social

Setting up Google Analytics

Now that you know a bit about Google Analytics and what it can do, it is time to get it set up on your website. The first step is to go to Google Analytics and set up your account. You can sign in with your Google account and then you will want to add a property for your website during their guided setup.

If you are using WordPress, there is a really simple plugin called Google Analytics Dashboard for WP that allows you to simply log in with your Google account and then the plugin will automatically set up Google Analytics for your site. It even displays some basic traffic data in your WordPress dashboard so you can easily keep track when you log into your site. This is the plugin I actually use for this site.

If you are not using WordPress, most CMS’s and platforms have a simple process for setting up Google Analytics so be sure to check out your platform’s documentation or reach out to their support. Lastly, Google Analytics will give you some code when you create your account. So, if you know how, you could simply copy and paste their code into your site and not have to worry about any integration tools at all.

What’s Next

Once you have your Google Analytics set up, there are a few more things you can do to better analyze your data. You can track your conversions and create dashboards to quickly see your most important data.

You can also use UTMs to create custom campaigns and get more specific data.

From there, you can track specific user events such as when a user clicks a submit button or downloads a document. If you are interested in learning more, refer to this article on event tracking with onclick.

Quickly Gain More Subscribers With These Lead Magnets

With many online businesses, growing your email list is one of the best ways to grow your community, loyalty, and revenue. But, how do you get your site visitors to want to join your mailing list? Email addresses are very important to people and they do not want to just give out their email address to anyone.

That is where lead magnets come in. Lead magnets are a free item that the user can get in exchange for joining your email list. There are many type of lead magnets out there and some are more effective than others. How do you know which ones you should try and how to get started? This is what I am going to answer today.

Choosing a Lead Magnet

If you look at the following list of lead magnets, you will see several different ones that you might be interested in trying with your audience. But, how do you know which one will work best? The key to creating a lead magnet is that it is relevant to your audience and also your content.

The key to creating a lead magnet is that it is relevant to your audience and also your content. Click To Tweet

For example, if you are a florist, recipes may be not as beneficial to your audience as a guide or checklist. However, if you have a post about choosing flowers for Valentine’s day, then a pdf of great Valentine’s dinner recipes may be beneficial to viewers of that post. So, look over the lead magnets and find some that are relevant to different parts of your website. Start with one that benefits your target user. Then, you can create others for particular parts of your website.

9 Lead Magnet Ideas

Coupon

This is my least favorite lead magnet as it tends to be the least effective. However, it is the easiest and quickest to set up. In this lead magnet, a user gets a coupon for their next purchase when signing up for your mailing list. The issue is that this offer is usually seen before the user decides to purchase. For example, if you are using a popup on your site, the user will probably click out of the popup before deciding to purchase. Once they decide to purchase, they have to either try to track down a form again or just not use the coupon. The other concern is that if the user hasn’t decided to purchase by the time he or she leaves your site, offering a coupon will not want to make them want to join your mailing list as the user does not intend to buy.

Checklist

This is one of my favorite lead magnets. Offering a checklist for the user to follow that relates to your business or content is a great benefit for the user and tends to convert well. An example would be a checklist for the user to follow to improve their site’s SEO. This is great to go along with a post that follows a step by step process. For example, if you create a post about what the most important items are for a chef, you could create a checklist that the user can print out to go to the store with or check off as they purchase the items. An example of this is my pre-launch landing page article which had a free pdf checklist users could download to use when building their launch pages.

Guide

Similar to the checklist, you can create a pdf guide for your users to download. An example would be a guide for taking care of the flowers. Another example would be a guide for setting up an email marketing campaign.

Free Tool

Consider building a free tool that is useful to your target user. A great example of this is HubSpot’s Marketing Grader which grades how well your site is set up for marketing and SEO. This tool collects your email address in order to use the tool which allows HubSpot to communicate with potential users.

Email Course

This is one of my favorite lead magnets. In this lead magnet, you have to create several lessons on a particular topic that your target user will find beneficial or want to learn more about. For example, my WordPress agency (My Local Webstop) offers a free 6 day email course on WordPress security. Once users sign up, they receive a lesson a day for the next several days. This is great because it positions you as an authority on that particular subject. Even better, is that you can re-purpose old content such as blog posts for these lessons or re-purpose these lessons for future content.

Quizzes or Surveys

A great way to gain subscribers is utilizing quizzes and surveys. You can have users take your quiz and provide them the results after the enter in their email address. For example, one of my previous clients runs a paleo diet site and offers a free carbohydrate intolerance quiz to help users discover if they have carbohydrate intolerance. The user can enter in their email address to receive their results. If you use WordPress, you can quickly and easily set this up using a tool such as Quiz And Survey Master.

Resource List

Something that can benefit new users in your industry is a resource list. This compiles all of your most used tools and resources so they can easily discover great tools to use for themselves. For example, my Blogging Toolkit is a list of the tools and services I use to improve my blog.

Recipes

If you run a site that your users may benefit from recipes, these are a great and easy lead magnet to create. Simply create a pdf that includes the ingredient, instructions, and maybe an image and you are good to go. However, you can apply this same thought to other industries as well. Maybe knitting patterns, paint-by-numbers kits, or even some woodworking how-to’s could also fall in this category.

Webinars

If you are comfortable with hosting a webinar, having users register to attend is a great way to gain subscribers. An average webinar is 30 to 40 people. So, running a couple of webinars a month can quickly grow your mailing list.

Now that you have some ideas, go create some lead magnets to grow your mailing list! Be sure to check out some of my lead magnets such as the Blogging Toolkit or the Pre-Launch Landing Page Checklist for ideas.